NHTSA Statistics Show a Decrease of Drunk Driving Deaths in 28 States

By:

Though the number of fatalities related to driving under the influence has historically been declining, in recent years, that decline has become gradual. And, new statistics released by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, confirm that overall numbers of DUI fatalities continue to fall gradually.

According to the new report, drunk driving fatalities in 2006 increased in 22 states and dropped in 28 states, as well as the District of Columbia and the U.S. territory of Puerto Rico. Overall, 13,470 related deaths occurred in 2006 involving drivers with a blood alcohol content (BAC) of .08 or higher. The number of deaths that occurred involving drivers with any amount of alcohol in their blood (i.e., even below the legal BAC limit) was 17,602.

These figures include drivers of any type of motor vehicle, including motorcycles, as well as others involved in fatal crashes related to DUI, such as pedestrians and cyclists.

The numbers of those over the national BAC limit of .08 prove to be slightly lower than the numbers from 2005, when 13,582 individuals were involved in fatal crashes of motor vehicles. Those with any alcohol in their blood were slightly up, from 17,590 in 2005.

As far as specific states are concerned, Arizona, Kansas and Texas showed the greatest increases in number of fatal DUI accidents during the past year, while Utah, Kansas and Iowa had the largest percentage increases compared to the previous year. Texas had the largest actual number drunk driving deaths with a total of 1,354.

On the other hand, Florida, Missouri and Pennsylvania displayed the greatest decreases in numbers of DUI-related deaths last year. The District of Columbia, Alaska and Delaware had the largest percentage decreases compared to 2005. Perhaps in some part due to its tiny geographical size, the District of Columbia featured the smallest actual number of DUI-related deaths with a total of 12.

The NHTSA announcement came at the same time as the launch of a new campaign just in time for Labor Day, which is historically one of the prime times of the year for DUI arrests and accidents. The campaign's slogan is simple: "Drunk Driving. Over the Limit. Under Arrest."


» Back to DUI Articles

PAID ATTORNEY ADVERTISEMENT: THIS WEB SITE IS A GROUP ADVERTISEMENT AND THE PARTICIPATING ATTORNEYS ARE INCLUDED BECAUSE THEY PAY AN ADVERTISING FEE. It is not a lawyer referral service or prepaid legal services plan. Total DUI is not a law firm.  Your request for contact will be forwarded to the local lawyer who has paid to advertise in the ZIP code you provide. Total DUI does not endorse or recommend any lawyer or law firm who participates in the network nor does it analyze a person's legal situation when determining which participating lawyers receive a person's inquiry. It does not make any representation and has not made any judgment as to the qualifications, expertise or credentials of any participating lawyer. The information contained herein is not legal advice. No representation is made that the quality of the legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers. Any information you submit to Total DUI does not create an attorney-client relationship and may not be protected by attorney-client privilege. Do not use the form to submit confidential, time-sensitive, or privileged information. All photos are of models and do not depict clients. All case evaluations are performed by participating attorneys. An attorney responsible for the content of this Site is Kevin W. Chern, Esq., licensed in Illinois with offices at 25 East Washington, Suite 400, Chicago, Illinois 60602. To see the attorney in your area who is responsible for this advertisement, please click here or call 866-200-8052.

FLORIDA ONLY: Total DUI is considered a lawyer referral service in the state of Florida under the Florida Rules of Professional Conduct. By all other standards, Total DUI is a group advertisement and not a lawyer referral service.

If you live in Mississippi, Missouri, New York or Wyoming, please click here for additional information.