Dec

17

By lnass

The 16th DUI charge of a Colorado man has provoked state legislators to reconsider drunken driving laws.

In November, a Colorado grand jury indicted Denny Lovern, 57, on several charges related with his latest DUI-related accident. Lovern himself admitted he “had a lot to drink and should not have been driving.”

The grand jury indicted Lovern on nine charges, including attempted first-degree assault and attempted manslaughter.

According to 18th Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler, Lovern’s case is the first time his office has pursued a chronic DUI offender with a grand jury indictment.

Colorado is one of five states, plus Washington D.C., does not have a felony DUI law. In Colorado, the greatest penalty for a DUI charge is one year in the county jail. The other states without a DUI felony law are Maine, Maryland, New Jersey and Pennsylvania.

Under particular circumstances, Colorado prosecutors bring felony DUI charges against an alleged offender if the charge is joined with a habitual traffic offender indictment. Even if a DUI charge is combined with an HTO charge, an offender can receive up to one and a half years in prison.

In Lovern’s case, he was not charged with an HTO because he had reinstated his license with the DMV.

Colorado Representative Mark Waller has twice proposed a felony DUI law, only to have the bill fail. Some legislators feel there is not enough data to support a felony DUI law making Colorado streets safer.

“It’s something we absolutely need in this state and we need it in this state because we have these guys who are on their fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth DUI, and treatment is no longer an incentive in any way for them,” Waller said. “It’s not getting the job done. You have to have other options to handle this very serious public safety issue.”

A new felony DUI bill is slated to be introduced in the Colorado Senate in January.

Jul

1

Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over – DUI Crackdown

By Mary Ann

By

A high number of sobriety checkpoints will go into effect all throughout the country this 4th of July week.

Regardless of what state you live in, you can expect to see DUI checkpoints, likely starting on Tuesday if they have not already begun, through the weekend as you are traveling.

Although these checkpoints will be happening around the clock, you can be sure they will be more prevalent in the late and overnight hours.

Don’t forget that DUI charges do not just mean consuming too much alcohol and driving a car. Driving under the influence can include driving a number or different vehicles, under the influence of a number of different substances.

Some areas will be on high alert, not just for intoxicated drivers, but for non-seat belt wearers as well. If you’re going to drink, don’t drive, and if you’re going to drive, or simply be in a car, wear your seat belt.

Possible DUI Penalties

  • Loss of your license
  • Fines
  • Probation
  • Alcohol/drug abuse counseling
  • Jail time
  • Increase in insurance rates

July 4th Holiday Historically

2007-2011

  • Motor vehicle crashes resulting in death (involving drivers with BACs of .08 or greater) = 780
  • That is 40% of all motor vehicle deaths in those 5 years

2011 Stats

  • Motor vehicle crashes resulting in death = 251
    • Amount of those crashes involving a driver with a BAC of .08 or greater = 38%
    • Amount of people age 18-34 that were legally intoxicated = over 50%

Statistics courtesy of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

How can you avoid trouble?

  • Have a designated driver
  • Take public transportation
  • Wear your seat belt
  • Call 911 if you see a drunk driver on the road

This nationwide campaign is called Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over.

Jun

21

Mother Denies Charge That She Killed Son in Drunk Driving Crash

By johnclark

By

A California mother has been accused of causing a fatal accident while driving under the influence of alcohol, but she claims the death of her son was the result of poor driving by someone else, according to a report from CBS News.


According to sources, Tyesha Garrett was arrested for a DUI this week after she allegedly crashed her car at around 4 a.m. while entering Interstate 80 in the Sacramento area.

While trying to enter the freeway, Garrett reportedly lost control of her SUV, causing the car to flip, and forcing her 11-year-old son Eric out of the car.

The impact of the crash killed Garrett’s young son, who was reportedly riding with his mother while she delivered copies of The Sacramento Bee to retail outlets in the city, sources say.

Fortunately, the other two children who accompanied Eric and his mother on her paper route survived the accident without injuries. But the surviving children, ages 10 and 3, will have to grow up with the presence of their older brother.

While some questioned why the children were in the car with Garrett at such an odd hour, the driver’s brother, Derek Garrett defended his sister by saying the children “like to stay up and just go for a drive with mom” during the summer months when school isn’t in session.

Derek also claimed his sister plans to argue that she wasn’t at fault in the fatal crash, for which she will likely face multiple felony DUI charges.

“From what I was told, is she was cut off by a driver and she tried to slam on her brakes to get out the way, and then the whole car just tipped over,” said the defendant’s brother.

He also said the DUI allegations were odd, given Tyesha Garrett’s reputation. “It’s not normal. She never drinks and drives; she never puts her family in harm’s way,” said the brother. “I’m very angry. I’m very frustrated and hurt by the situation.”

But despite these claims, Tyesha Garrett will have to prove in court that she wasn’t at fault when her car fatally flipped on the side of the highway. She refused to speak to local sources, but is expected to make her first court appearance early next week.

In the meantime, she and her family will mourn the loss of 11-year-old Eric, a child who “loved to go outside and just play” and who was “just a happy kid,” according to his uncle.

May

16

Will a BAC Limit of .05 Really Make a Big Difference?

By Mary Ann

By

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has made their recommendation. Now the states can decide if they want to adjust the BAC threshold from .08 to .05 and the federal government can decide if they want to provide incentives to push states in one direction or another.

Considering it took 24 years to get all 50 states to change the BAC limit from .15 to .08 (1980-2004), we may be talking about this for quite some time.

The real question is: If this new threshold goes into effect, what will the impact be?

The NHTSA is looking at how many lives will be saved but is this .05 to .08 BAC group of people the people to be most concerned about?

In an August 2012 report, the NHTSA reported that of all alcohol impaired driving fatalities, 70% involved a driver with a BAC of .15 or more.

In fact, in 2010, the most common BAC on record in fatal crashes involving drinking drivers was .18.

Given that many DUI fatalities result from crashes where a driver had a BAC higher than .08, how likely is it that further lowering the BAC limit will have a strong impact on these drivers who are involved in the majority of alcohol impaired driving fatalities?

While lowering the BAC level further may help to prevent additional fatalities, perhaps more focus needs to be directed to increasing focus and penalities on the higher BAC groups.

Apr

12

Juvenille Detention Escapee Charged with 7 Felony DUIs

By Mary Ann

By

On Wednesday, 18-year-old Jean Ervin Soriano, was charged with 7 felony DUIs after the March 30th accident that killed 5 and injured 2. He is also being charged with failure to decrease speed and driving without a license, both misdemeanors.

Soriano is being held on $3.5 million bail and is in isolated protective custody. He had a blood-alcohol percentage of 0.12, well over Nevada’s legal limit of .08.

A plea has not been entered yet, but a not guilty plea is expected, per Soriano’s attorney, Frank Cofer.

Soriano, in a Dodge Durango with a friend, rear ended a family in a Chevrolet van, driving back from visiting a sick relative Denver.

The accident caused the van to overturn, which led to the deaths of Genaro Fernandez, 41, Raudel Fernandez-Avila, 49, Belen Fernandez, 53, Angela Sandoval, 13, and Leonardo Fernandez-Avila, 45.

The only survivors in the vehicle were Maria Rosario Cardanas, 40, the driver, and Eddie Sandoval, 15.

An evidence hearing is scheduled for May 15th and investigators for the defense intend to collect blood and tissue samples from the Durango to show whether or not Soriano was actually driving.

On March 1st it was reported that Soriano had escaped from a juvenile detention center catering to drug and alcohol abusers in Orange County, California. The accident happened about 80 miles northeast of Las Vegas.

Apr

9

Driving Under The Influence of Drowsiness

By Mike

Though you may already know the dangers of driving while intoxicated, you should also be aware of another deadly form of driving. Drowsy driving claims hundreds of drivers each year in fatal crashes.


driving under influence drowsiness

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Crash Report

Drowsy driving causes numerous deaths, injures thousands, and results in tremedous destruction of property every year.

Average Annual Drowsy-Related Accidents from 2005 to 2009

  • Fatal: 886
  • Injury: 37,000
  • Property Damage Only: 45,000
  • Average Total: 83,000

Driver fatigue results in around $12.5 billion in monetary losses every year.

Drowsy Driving: The Demographics

Some are more likely than others to continue driving despite their level of exhaustion.

What ages typically drive while sleepy?

  • 18-29: 71%
  • 30-64: 52%
  • 65 and older: 19%

In a National Sleep Foundation poll, men were found to have a 22% chance of falling asleep at the wheel, while women only had a 12% chance.

  • 56% of men will drive while drowsy.
  • Only 45% of women would do the same.
  • 1 in 4 people with a regular daytime work schedule will drive while drowsy at least a few days a month.
  • Those who slept 6 to 7 hours a night were 2 times more likely to get into a wreck than those who slept for 8 hours.

Transportation Industry

Do you think these workers get enough sleep?

  • 45% of truck drivers say they rarely get enough sleep the night before a driving shift.
  • Of those driving a bus, limo or taxi, 43% use caffeinated beverages to stay awake at work.
  • 81% of truck drivers and 82% of bus, taxi and limo drivers get less than 8 hours of sleep on an average work night.

Sleeping at the Wheel

Many people fall asleep at the wheel but few know when to pull over and stop driving.

  • 37% of people have fallen asleep or at least nodded off at the wheel at some point in their lives.
  • Around 60% of drivers have felt drowsy while driving in the past year.
  • A study by Australian researchers uncovered that driving after not sleeping for 24 hours is equivalent to having a .10 blood alcohol concentration.

How Drivers React to Feeling Drowsy

  • Stressed: 42%
  • Impatient: 32%
  • Drive Faster: 12%

Drunk vs. Drowsy

Drunk Driving Stats

  • $37 billion in damages annually
  • 1/3 of traffic fatalities in the U.S.
  • 10,000 fatalitites in 2010.

Drowsy Driving Stats

  • 100,000 crashes annually
  • 40,000 crashes resulted in injuries
  • 1,550 fatalities annually

It’s important to note that drowsy driving is underreported, in part because there is no test for drowsiness while drunkenness can be determined by a blood test.

Brought to you by Total DUI.

Mar

26

Georgia Looks to Strengthen DUI Penalties

By Mary Ann

By

Were you already convicted of DUI in Georgia and convicted for a 2nd time? Watch out! Things could be getting more strict for you.

The Georgia Senate has approved a more strict punishment for driving under the influence convictions for multiple time offenders.

Anyone convicted of more than one DUI in a 5 year period could be looking at a longer relationship with their breath-test lock on their car ignition.

The bill has to go to the House before the law can be revised but offenders may see an increase from an 8 month probationary license to one year.

Currently, after 120 days without a valid license, a probationary license can be obtained (for 8 months) as long as their car is equipped with the ignition lock that tests the driver’s blood alcohol content before starting.

Feb

4

Can I get charged with DUI without driving?

By admin

By

Many people don’t know that in some states APC is the same as DUI. What is APC? APC stands for actual physical control.

Essentially what this means is that in some states, you can get a driving under the influence charge while not driving. In other states, such as California, there must be “volitional movement” for DUI.

DUI attorney, Jeff Yeh says, “If you feel it is necessary to pull over and rest, find a legitimate parking space instead of pulling over by the side of the road, which invites suspicion. An even better idea would be to move to the passenger’s seat to sleep. Moreover, make sure the engine is turned off, and preferably the keys are not in the ignition.”

The definition of actual physical control differs by state but the basic understanding centers on whether or not you have the ability (or control) to operate the vehicle.

Factors that are considered when determining actual physical control include:

  1. If you’re awake
  2. If your headlights are on
  3. Where the ignition key is
  4. If the vehicle is legally parked or in the roadway
  5. If your vehicle’s engine is running or the ignition is on
  6. Where and in what position you are found in the vehicle

As mentioned above, the laws in every state differ and each case is looked at on a case by case basis but here are some examples of cases where people have been charged with DUI and were not driving.

  • Someone sleeping in the drivers’ seat of their car with the car off and their keys in their pocket.
  • Someone sitting in the drivers’ seat with the keys in the ignition, just listening to music.
  • Someone stumbling up to their car fumbling their keys to open the door.
  • Someone walking from their car to their front door that had been seen previously drinking.

The bottom line is if you’re under the influence and in physical control of your vehicle, you may be arrested for DUI depending on what state you’re in.

After that, it will be up to the courts to decide, but hiring a competent DUI attorney to defend your case probably in your best interest.

Jan

15

Drinking Laws and DUI Fatalities

By admin

By

Driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol is a common issue faced by many countries all over the world. When looking at international legalities, it seems tougher laws allowing for extensive fines and penalties upon conviction do play a role in reducing the number of DUI related fatalities.

United States

In the United States, a federal law, The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984, does not prohibit minors from drinking. Instead, it prohibits the purchase and “public possession” of alcohol by anyone under the age of 21. There are some exceptions to this rule.

For instance, drinking is allowed for an established religious purpose when the minor is accompanied by a parent or guardian who is at least 21 years old. When prescribed by a doctor or other medical professional, alcohol consumption is allowed.

Minors may drink in private clubs and establishments. Minors may also consume alcohol as part of employment when required by an appropriately licensed manufacturer, wholesaler, or retailer.

Many states have legally prohibited youth consumption, but some have exceptions in place for consumption on private property, though the definition of private property may vary.

The legal limit in the United States is .08. The penalties vary from state-to-state, and range from fines to license revocation and community service or jail time. Repeat offenders may have to have an interlock device installed, which requires the driver to blow into a breathalyzer before the car will start.

Some states have a zero-tolerance policy for drivers under the age of 21, and commercial drivers have a legal limit of .04.

In 2010, the rate of driving fatalities involving alcohol-impaired drivers per 100,000 population was 3.3, representing a 64% decrease since record keeping began in 1982.

Canada

Canada allows citizens who are 18 (19 in some provinces) to legally consume alcohol. DUI is a serious offense; so serious, in fact, that Canada prohibits some Americans with a DUI conviction from entering their country.

The nationwide legal limit is .08. For novice and young drivers, there is a nationwide zero-tolerance policy. For those under restriction because of administrative sanction, there is a .05 limit.

Canada uses a tiered system to determine the minimum and maximum punishments for DUI based on BAC, with tougher punishments for those who cause bodily harm because of DUI, and even tougher punishments for those who cause death because of DUI. Penalties and laws may vary by province.

First-time offenders who have BACs higher than .08 face a $1,000 fine, with a minimum of 30 days imprisonment, and a maximum of 5 years in prison. If this is a second offense, offenders face a minimum of 120 days and a maximum of 10 years in prison.

If the DUI causes bodily harm, first-time offenders with BACs higher than .08 face a $1,000 fine, with a minimum of 30 days imprisonment, and a maximum of 10 years in prison. If this is a second offense, offenders face a minimum of 120 days and a maximum of 10 years in prison.

If the DUI causes death, first-time offenders with BACs higher than .08 face a $1,000 fine, with a minimum of 30 days imprisonment, and a maximum of life in prison. If this is a second offense, offenders face a minimum of 120 days and a maximum of life in prison.

Between 1999 and 2009, it’s estimated that 13,174 deaths occurred because of DUI in Canada. In 2009, there were only 1,074 fatalities because of DUI.

Belgium

In 2001, Belgium saw 145 million DUI-related deaths, and through legislative changes was able to reduce the number to 89 million in 2009. Even with the great reduction, it is still a far cry from the national goal of no more than 750 DUI-related deaths per year.

The legal limit in Belgium is .05. Belgium allows citizens who are 16 to consume alcohol, though some beverages cannot be consumed until a person turns 18.

Legislation as of January 2011 provides a tiered penalty structure based on the BAC of the offender.

Offenders found with a BAC between .05 and .08 are banned from driving for three hours, immediately fined 137.50 Euros, and may face an additional fine anywhere between 137.50 and 2,750 Euros and a revocation of driving privileges when they make a court appearance.

Offenders found with a BAC between .08 and .12 are banned from driving for six hours and immediately fined 400 Euros. In the case of dangerous driving, offenders are required to immediately surrender their license for a minimum of 15 days. Offenders face an additional fine anywhere between 1,100 and 11,000 Euros and a revocation of driving privileges when they make a court appearance.

Offenders found with a BAC between .12 and .15 are banned from driving for six hours and immediately fined 550 Euros. In the case of dangerous driving, offenders are required to immediately surrender their license for a minimum of 15 days. Offenders face an additional fine anywhere between 1,100 and 11,000 Euros and a revocation of driving privileges when they make a court appearance.

Offenders found with a BAC of .15 or higher are banned from driving for six hours. In the case of dangerous driving, offenders are required to immediately surrender their license for a minimum of 15 days. Their case is immediately sent to a judge, where offenders face an additional fine anywhere between 1,100 and 11,000 Euros and a revocation of driving privileges.

Police have the right to randomly test any driver, and while the driver cannot refuse the test, they can request to wait 15 minutes before being tested.

Italy

In Italy, people who are 16 years old can legally consume alcohol. In 2002, the Italian government issued a National Road Safety Plan (PNSS) to reduce the number of road fatalities by 40% by 2010, though this was later revised to meet the European target of 50%.

By 2009, Italy had only reduced the number of deaths by 43%, with 4,050 deaths that year. In 2010, the Italian government approved new legislation to reduce the legal BAC down from .05 to .00 for new, young, and professional drivers.

The zero-tolerance policy lead to fines and five penalty points for drivers found with a BAC between .00 and .05; in the case of accidents, the penalty points double. The legislation also requires new and professional drivers who have had their license revoked to wait five years before applying for a new license.

For the rest of the driving population in Italy, the BAC limit remains at .05, but fines have been increased by 33%, as well as the number of penalty points and the minimum jail time required upon conviction. Drivers who are found with levels at 1.5 g/l may now serve a minimum of six months in jail, compared to the previous three months.

In addition, there are provisions for alcohol and drug testing a person must pass in order to receive a driver’s license. Drivers who have three or more serious offenses—offenses carrying five or more points each—within a two-year period are required to retake the theory test to receive their license again.

While laws and penalties vary worldwide, the end goal is clearly the same everywhere: preventing accidental death on the highway. With tougher laws in place, citizens are deterred from getting behind the wheel while intoxicated.

Jan

7

The Science Behind Sobriety Tests

By admin

By

Law enforcement officers are on the lookout for drunk drivers. Part of their training involves learning the Standardized Field Sobriety Test (SFST) through a program administered and accredited by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP).

Developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Association (NHTSA), the SFST is a collection of three tests designed to help officers determine whether or not someone is driving under the influence of alcohol.

The three tests are: Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus (HGN), Walk-and-Turn (WAT), and the One-Leg Stand (OLS).

HGN

HGN is an involuntary eye jerking movement that occurs at the extreme periphery of the eye. When a person is intoxicated, HGN is present at lesser angles. Officers use a small object, such as a pen or flashlight, to test for intoxication.

The suspects are required to follow the object as they slowly move it in front of the suspect’s eyes. While conducting this test, officers look for three key signs:

  • Is the subject able to follow the object smoothly?
  • Does the subject show HGN at maximum deviation?
  • Does the onset of HGN occur within 45 degrees of the center?

If the officer sees for or more signs between the two eyes, it is likely the suspect has a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .08 or higher.

The NHTSA has found this test has an 88% accuracy rate, primarily because HGN can be an indication of factors other than alcohol consumption.

HGN also occurs with the consumption of seizure medications, various inhalants, phencyclidine, barbiturates, and other depressants.

WAT

The WAT test is a divided attention test because it aims to see how well a suspect can do two things at once. When conducting this test, the officer asks the suspect to walk a straight line. Suspects are asked to take nine heel-to-toe steps, while keeping their arms down to their side. Suspects are then asked to turn on one foot, and take another nine heel-to-toe steps in the opposite direction.

The officer looks for eight signs of intoxication:

  • Does the suspect start walking before instructions are finished?
  • Does the suspect maintain balance during the instruction?
  • Does the suspect stop to regain balance?
  • Does the suspect touch heel-to-toe?
  • Does the suspect step off the line?
  • Does the suspect use their arms to balance?
  • Does the suspect make an improper turn?
  • Does the suspect take the correct number of steps?

If the suspect displays two or more of these signs, it is likely they have a BAC of .08 or higher.

The NHTSA has found this test has a 79% accuracy rate.

OLS

The OLS test is another divided attention test, aiming to see how well a suspect can do two things at once. When conducting this test, the officer asks the suspect to stand with one foot about six inches off the ground, and count out loud by thousands, until asked to put their foot down.

Suspects should count like this: “One thousand-one, one thousand-two, one thousand-three,” etc. until the officer tells them to stop. The officer will observe the suspect for about 30 seconds and watch for the following signs of intoxication:

  • Does the suspect sway back and forth?
  • Does the suspect use their arms to balance?
  • Does the suspect hop to maintain balance?
  • Does the suspect put their foot down?

If the suspect displays two or more of these signs, it is likely they have a BAC of .08 or higher.

The NHTSA has found this test has an 83% accuracy rate.

Disclaimer: This information is not intended to promote drunk driving. Do not attempt to beat these tests.

Oct

3

Georgia Election Official Jailed for Failing to Finish DUI School

By Mike

By

The head of elections in Fulton County, Georgia, is currently serving a 10-day jail sentence after failing to show up for a probation hearing related to a past DUI conviction, according to a recent report from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

Sources say that Sam Westmoreland, the elections chief in Fulton County, had his probation revoked by State Court Judge Wesley Taylor, who had allowed the official to postpone his jail sentence until after the county’s primary elections had been completed in July.

This summer, when Judge Taylor issued the delayed jail sentence, he said that doing so would prevent a “potential hardship upon the voters of Fulton County.”

So Westmoreland has known for a few months that his jail sentence was on the horizon, but sources say there is no indication whether the official will have to leave his post.

This week, the county’s election board has set a meeting to discuss Westmoreland’s future, which was already a bit cloudy thanks to pressure from voters and other election officials after the July primary vote was marred by a series of errors.

These errors included the election board’s faulty assignment of nearly 700 voters to the wrong state House and state Senate ballots. Westmoreland and his staff also missed the deadline to certify the results of the election by more than an hour.

DUI arrests don’t usually result in consequences as severe as a job loss, but Westmoreland’s unique position of authority does require that he hold himself to a higher standard of trust, according to some board members.

According to Bill Edwards, another Fulton County official, Westmoreland “needs to be gone” because his actions go straight to his “character.”

Westmoreland’s legal troubles started in December 2009, when state police arrested him after he was driving erratically and failed a field sobriety test.

A blood sample taken shortly after his arrest showed that he had been driving under the influence of benzodiazepine, a sedative that crippled his ability to drive safely.

After his arrest, however, Westmoreland failed to complete his studies at DUI school, and he failed to complete his community service hours, both of which were requirements of his probation agreement, according to sources.

Due to his blatant disregard for the terms of his probation, the court removed his deal, and sentenced him to the brief stint in jail. But the brief jail stint could prove very costly for the public figure.

Sep

6

NFL Cracks Down on DUIs and Untouchable Football Stars

By Mike

NFL stars might score touchdowns and send fans into a frenzy, but they’re not perfect. Within the last year, numerous professional football players have either failed a breath test or refused a breathalyzer during a traffic stop.


nfl-shapshot-duis

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It’s easy enough to forget this about public figures we idolize, but football players are only human and vulnerable to the same mistakes anyone else is.

One mistake that’s been a hot topic this year is drinking and driving. Here’s a look at the players who’ve gotten DUIs in 2012 alone.

1: Aldon Smith – San Francisco 49ers

Position:Linebacker

Reason for Arrest: DUI

Location of Arrest:Miami Beach

Bail/bond:Bond was set at $1000

Details of the Incident:The 23-year-old was booked at about 9:30 am.

2: Knowshon Moreno – Denver Broncos

Position:Running Back

Reason for Arrest:Drunken driving, careless driving

Location of Arrest:South Denver

Bail/bond:N/A

Details of the Incident:

  • He had allegedly been driving 70 mph in a 45 mph construction zone.
  • He failed a field sobriety test.
  • He was driving a drop-top Bentley with a license plate that read “SAUCED”.

3: Darrius-Heyward-Bey – Oakland Raiders

Position: Wide Receiver

Reason for Arrest: DUI

Location of Arrest: Bay Bridge

Bail/bond: N/A

Details of the Incident:

  • He was pulled over at about 2 a.m. after going to a night club in San Francisco.
  • His BAC was .13 percent based on a chemical test done at the scene.
  • He’s fighting his DUI charge in a trial starting July 23.

4: Brandon Meriweather – Washington Redskins

Position: Strong safety

Reason for arrest: Drunk driving

Location of arrest: Arlington County

Bail/bond: N/A

Details of the incident:

  • He was allegedly driving 73 mph in a 55 mph zone at about 3 a.m.
  • He refused to take a Breathalyzer test and failed the field sobriety test.

5: Nick Fairley – Detroit Lions

Position: Defensive tackle

Reason for arrest: DUI, attempting to elude police

Location of arrest: Interstate 10 in Alabama

Bail/bond: Bond was set at $1,750

Details of the incident:

  • He was allegedly driving a Cadillac Escalade at 100 mph.

He was also cited for:

  • Reckless Driving
  • An open alcohol container
  • No proof of insurance

6: Jerome Felton – Minnesota Vikings

Position: Fullback

Reason for arrest: Second-degree driving while impaired

Location of arrest: McDonald’s drive-thru lane in Eden Prairie, Minnesota

Bail/bond: Bail was set at $12,000

Details of the incident:

  • McDonald’s called the police to report an intoxicated driver in the drive-thru at about 3 a.m.

7: Justin Blackmon – Jacksonville Jaguars

Position: Wide receiver

Reason for arrest: DUI

Location of arrest: Stillwater, Oklahoma

Bail/bond: N/A

Details of the incident:

  • He had a .24 blood-alcohol level.
  • Weighing about 215 lbs, this means he would have had to consume about 14 drinks

8: David Diehl – New York Giants

Position: Offensive lineman

Reason for arrest: Driving while intoxicated

Location of arrest: Queens

Bail/bond: N/A

Details of the incident:

  • According to police, he crashed into several parked cars leaving a bar.
  • No one was injured.
  • At 6’5″ and 304 pounds, he registered a 0.18 on his Breathalyzer test, which probably indicated a relatively high volume of drinking.

9: Aaron Berry – Detroit Lions

Position: Cornerback

Reason for arrest: DUI

Location of arrest: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Bail/bond: N/A

Details of the incident:

  • He reportedly hit parked cars and tried to flee the scene.
  • He was charged with:
  • Driving under the influence.
  • Two counts of failure to stop and render aid leaving the scene of an accident.
  • Two counts of accident involving unattended vehicles.

10: Eric Wright – Tampa Bay Buccaneers

Position: Cornerback

Reason for arrest: Suspicion of DUI

Location of arrest: Los Angeles

Bail/bond: Bond was posted at $100,000

Details of the incident:

  • He was arrested on a felony charge because he allegedly hit another car causing injury and requiring the presence of the LA Fire Department.
  • He admitted to drinking but refused the Breathalyzer and field sobriety tests.
  • He ended up not facing charges.

Conclusion

Unfortunately, there have already been several DUIs for NFL players already in 2012, causing disappointment among fans, coaches, and teammates. There’s been much debate about what sort of actions should be taken, and there will probably be more developments in the future.

Brandon Meriweather [8]
Position: Strong safety
Reason for arrest: Drunk driving
Location of arrest: Arlington County
Bail/bond: N/A
Details of the incident:
He was allegedly driving 73 mph in a 55 mph zone at about 3 a.m.
He refused to take a Breathalyzer test and failed the field sobriety test.
Nick Fairley [9][10]
Position: Defensive tackle
Reason for arrest: DUI, attempting to elude police
Location of arrest: Interstate 10 in Alabama
Bail/bond: Bond was set at $1,750
Details of the incident:
He was allegedly driving a Cadillac Escalade at 100 mph.
He was also cited for:
Reckless driving
An open alcohol container
No proof of insurance
Jerome Felton [11][12][13]
Position: Fullback
Reason for arrest: Second-degree driving while impaired
Location of arrest: McDonald’s drive-thru lane in Eden Prairie, Minnesota
Bail/bond: Bail was set at $12,000
Details of the incident:
McDonald’s called the police to report an intoxicated driver in the drive-thru at about 3 a.m.
Justin Blackmon [14][15]
Position: Wide receiver
Reason for arrest: DUI
Location of arrest: Stillwater, Oklahoma
Bail/bond: N/A
Details of the incident:
He had a .24 blood-alcohol level.
Weighing about 215 lbs., this means he would have had to consume about 14 drinks over a 5-hour time period.
David Diehl [16]
Position: Offensive lineman
Reason for arrest: Driving while intoxicated
Location of arrest: Queens
Bail/bond: N/A
Details of the incident:
According to police, he crashed into several parked cars leaving a bar.
No one was injured.
At 6’5” and 304 pounds he registered a 0.18 on his Breathalyzer test,  which probably indicated a relatively high volume of drinking.
Aaron Berry [17] (June 23) Detroit Lions
Position: Cornerback
Reason for arrest: DUI
Location of arrest: Harrisburg, Pennsylvania
Bail/bond: N/A
Details of the incident:
He reportedly hit parked cars and tried to flee the scene.
He was charged with:
Driving under the influence.
Two counts of failure to stop and render aid leaving the scene of an accident.
Two counts of accidents involving unattended vehicles.
Eric Wright [18][19]
Position: Cornerback
Reason for arrest: Suspicion of DUI
Location of arrest: Los Angeles
Bail/bond: Bond was posted at $100,000
Details of the incident:
He was arrested on a felony charge because he allegedly hit another car causing injury and requiring the presence of the LA Fire Department.
He admitted to drinking but refused the Breathalyzer and field sobriety tests.
He ended up not facing charges.
Conclusion
Unfortunately, there have already been several DUIs for NFL players already in 2012, causing disappointment among fans, coaches, and teammates. There’s been much debate about what sort of actions should be taken, and there will probably be more developments in the future.

Brought to you by Total DUI.

Aug

24

Which is Worse for You: Alcohol or Marijuana?

By Mary Ann

Regardless of whether you’re driving after drinking alcohol, or driving after smoking marijuana, getting caught by the police may be a felony or a misdemeanor charge. But how does each one affect your body and your ability to drive?


Is alcohol or marijuana worse for you?

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The Battle Between Alcohol and Marijuana

Some may believe widespread drug use is non-existent and alcoholism affects very few people in the United States. Unfortunately, this is not the case and many are affected by the use of these addictive substances. In this infographic, you’ll learn who is using these drugs and how common it is in America.

Marijuana

Areas of the Brain Receptive to Marijuana

THC, the main chemical compound found in marijuana, affects these three cannabinoid receptor sites in the brain when the drug is consumed.

Cerebullum

  • Coordination

Hippocampus

  • Recollection of Recent Events

Basal Ganglia

  • Unconscious Muscle Movement

Marijuana Use

  • In 2010, 17.4 million people were using marijuana every month.
    • In 2007, the number of marijuana users was 14.4 million.
  • 4.5 million people were reported as abusing or having dependency issues with marijuana.
  • 61.8% of illicit drug users in 2010 said their first drug was marijuana.

Marijuana use in 2010

  • 1 in 6 kids will abuse or become addicted to marijuana compared to 1 in 25 adults.
  • Average age of first use: 18.4 years old.
  • Average age of first use: 18.4 years old.
  • Used marijuana 20 or more days a month: 39.9%
  • Used marijuana 300 days in a row: 15.7%

Some Effects of Marijuana

  • Causes short-term memory loss.
  • Sleep issues.
  • Episodes of psychosis.
  • Faster heart rate.
  • Impairment of cognitive functions.
  • Detrimental effects to balance and coordination.
  • Results in problems with memory and learning.
  • Can cause addiction.
  • Increased risk for chronic lung issues.
  • Possible increase in the risk for anxiety and depression.

Alcohol

Alcohol Use

  • 15 liters of pure alcohol are consumed per 1,000 Americans.
  • Only 17.7% of people in the U.S. will not drink alcohol in their lifetime.
  • Percent of male population dying from alcohol-related disease annually: 5.48%
  • Percent of female population dying from alcohol-related disease annually: 1.92%

Most consumed alcoholic beverages in the U.S.

Beer Spirits Wine
53% 31% 16%

Areas of the Brain Vulnerable to Alcohol

Cerebellum

  • Coordinating Movement

Frontal Lobe

  • Learning and Memory

Cerebral Cortex

  • Thought Processing and Consciousness

Hypothalamus and Pituitary

  • Monitors Automatic Brain Function and Hormone Release

Most common causes of death attributed to alcohol in the world, by disease:

  • Cirrhosis of the Liver
  • Epilepsy
  • Oesophagus Cancer
  • Liver Cancer
  • Mouth and Oropharynx Cancers
  • Breast Cancer
  • Colon and Rectum Cancers
  • Cerebrovascular Disease
  • Ischaemic Heart Disease

Conclusion
While alcohol may contain a good number of diseases with its extended consumption, marijuana has its own number of detrimental effects. Not everything is known about the long-term effects of consistent substance abuse though research is constantly arising to present new insight.

 

Provided by Total DUI.

Aug

2

Alcohol: A Poison to Your Body and Mind

By Topher

Before you start on that third beer, rethink what you consider safe alcohol consumption to be. You may be increasing the probability of getting arrested for DUI if you get behind the wheel.

In this infographic, you’ll learn about the effects on your body and mind when you drink more than a sensible amount.


Alcohol: A Poison to Your Body and Mind

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Alcohol: A Poison to Your Body and Mind

Before you start on that third beer, rethink what you consider safe alcohol consumption to be. In this infographic, you’ll learn about the effects on your body and mind when you drink more than a sensible amount.

A Drunken Mind

Detrimental Effects on the Brain

  • Accelerated brain shrinkage.
  • Muscle movement and coordination issues.
  • Blackouts, memory loss, and emotional outbursts.
  • Development of learning disabilities.
  • The growth of new brain cells is slowed.
  • Changes in temperature, heart rate, and breathing can lead to unconsciousness and possibly death.
  • Possible thiamine deficiency, which affects your cardiovascular and nervous systems.
  • Suppressed ability to become sexually aroused and perform sexual acts.
  • Improper sleeping patterns.
  • Numbness of body as a result of peripheral neuropathy.

Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

  • The Center for Disease Control estimates that .5 to 1.5 babies are born with FAS for every 1000 live births.
  • Alcohol consumption during pregnancy can lead to:
    • Inhibited nerve cell growth.
    • Instead of proper nerve cell growth, the body could produce alternate cells.
    • Possible defects in the formation of axons—the carriers of brain signals between cells.
    • Interference with genes that tell the infant’s body to make protein and when to stop.

Brain Damage During Child Development

  • First Trimester
    • Detrimental damage to brain development and facial deformities.
  • Second Trimester
    • Reduction in the number of brain cells.
  • Third Trimester
    • Brain cells are killed outright and essential pre-birth brain development is nonexistent.

The Facts

  • 7% of all people with FAS do not have a corpus callosum—the connection between the right and left sides of the brain.
    • This brain defect is 20 times more common in people with FAS than the general population.
  • An estimated 4 out of 100 children of heavy drinkers will have full FAS, though birth defects may still be present.
    • Mothers who drink 7 to 14 alcoholic beverages a week will probably not see full fetal alcohol syndrome in their babies.
    • However, a fetus exposed to more than 7 drinks a week is 3 to 5 times more likely to experience birth defects.

A Toxic Body

It’s common knowledge that students will consume alcohol at some point in their college careers, but what percentage of students actually see injuries as a result of their drinking?

College Drinking Incidents

# of Drinks Imbibed % of Students Drinking % of Students Reporting an Alcohol Related Injury
1 13 2
2 21 7
3 18 12
4 15 16
5 12 16
6 8 15
7 4 9
8 3 7
9+ 5 14

Drinking and Driving

Age Alcohol-Impaired Driving Fatalities
16 to 20 1,477
25 to 34 3,312
45 to 54 1,493
65 to 74 257
75+ 132

Short-term Alcohol Effects

  • Light Drinking
    • Relaxation
    • Sluggish Brain Activity
    • Short Attention Span
    • Slower Motor Skills
  • Moderate Drinking
    • Slurred Speech
    • Emotionally Unpredictable
    • Lower Body Temperature
    • Sleepiness
  • Heavy Drinking
    • Blackouts
    • Alcohol Poisoning
    • Possibility of Death
    • Impaired Breathing

Long-Term Effects of Alcohol on the Body

  • Heart and Circulatory System
    • Veins constrict resulting in heat loss while the drinker experiences warmth.
    • Increased blood pressure and heartbeat speed.
    • Eventually can cause cardiomyopathy, heart disease, coronary heart disease, and cardiac arrest.
    • Increased chance of bruising and bleeding.
    • Possible blood clots and anemia
    • Damaged immune system.
  • Liver
    • Fat metabolizes differently.
    • Eventually scars the liver.
    • Higher chance of developing hepatitis.
  • Digestive System
    • Ulcers
    • Acid Reflux
    • Irritation of the pancreas.
    • Erosion of stomach lining.
    • Bleeding of the intestinal tract.
    • Possible stomach cancer.
    • Risk of esophageal, mouth, and larynx cancer.
    • Low blood sugar and possibly diabetes.
    • Could possibly develop malnutrition over time.
  • Lungs
    • Can cause pneumonia, lung collapse, and infections.
    • Fluid in the lungs.
  • Bones
    • Joint Inflammation
    • Muscle Atrophy
    • Can cause osteoporosis from calcium loss.
  • Skin
    • Drains vitamins and minerals necessary for a healthy look.
  • Kidneys
    • Known to cause kidney failure, resulting in death.
  • Pancreas
    • Reduces pancreatic secretion that can eventually cause digestive enzyme leaks, which will cause the pancreas to eat itself.

How a Hangover Works

A hangover is your body’s way of saying you’ve poisoned it.

  • Symptoms:
    • Cottonmouth
    • Nausea
    • Fatigue
    • Headache
    • Weakened Immune System
  • Men have more water in their bodies, allowing alcohol to be more diluted and therefore allowing more alcohol to be consumed.
  • Sugary drinks can reduce a hangover’s effects.
  • The saying “liquor before beer, you’re in the clear”, is not a valid assumption. It’s the amount of alcohol consumed, not the order in which you drink it.
  • Having a drink the next morning will only delay your hangover until your BAC returns to 0.

Conclusion

Alcohol has many detrimental effects on the body, most of which you can prevent just by avoiding drinking altogether. If you do choose to imbibe alcohol, you should forego drinking and driving, not only for your safety but also for the safety of others. Alcohol’s damage can be extensive to your body, wallet, and mind if you aren’t responsible and careful.

Provided by Total DUI.

Jul

25

Surrendering to Social Media: Is It Addiction?

By Topher

When we think of addiction, we often think of chain smokers, alcoholics, and hardcore drug addicts. And for good reason – those addictions often bring ill effects on society, such as second hard smoke, drunk driving, and gang violence. But any habit can turn into addiction, including using popular social media sites like Twitter and Facebook.

How do you know if you’re addicted?


Social Media Addiction

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Social Media Addiction

You see how many Facebook friends post pictures and update their statuses on a regular basis, but just how drawn into social media are we these days?

  • It’s been predicted that Facebook will reach 1 billion users by August 2012.
  • In September 2011, it was reported that 100 million people actively used Twitter.

If so many people are on social media sites, how excessively are they using them?

Is it Addiction?

In a national survey of 1,000 teens, 50% said they visited social a networking site every day.

  • Many admit to being addicted, but they also see social media as a positive.
    • 50% said social media had helped their friendships.
    • 30% said social networks made them feel outgoing.

Research from the University of Maryland showed 4 out of 5 students experienced negative side effects when disconnecting from technology for a day.

  • Most students couldn’t make it without media for 24 hours.
  • Some of them felt:
    • Depressed
    • Confused
    • Insecure
    • Panicked
    • Lonely
    • Dependent
  • Many admitted to being addicted to mobile phones and social networking.

Other recent research reveals it may be harder to refrain from tweeting than it is to refrain from:

  • Smoking
  • Consuming Alcohol

This might be because of the associated costs of using each:

  • Social media costs you your time.
  • Cigarettes and alcohol have long-term health and monetary costs.

Are You Addicted?

It’s not hard to get sucked into the social media frenzy.

In fact, social networking sites are designed to keep drawing you back in. They do this through:

  • Status Updates
  • Comments
  • Email Notifications
  • And any other way you can reach out to the site or have the site reach out to you.

The Bergen Facebook Addiction Scale has been used to determine if people are addicted to this extremely popular social networking site.

It’s based on how people rank the following statements: very rarely, rarely, sometimes, often, very often.

  • You use Facebook so much that it has a negative impact on your studies or job.
  • You become troubled or restless if you can’t use Facebook.
  • You’ve tried to reduce the time spent on the site, but it didn’t work.
  • You go on Facebook to forget about your personal problems.
  • You spend a lot of time using or planning to use Facebook.
  • You want to use Facebook more and more.
  • If you chose “often” or “always” for at least 4 of these statements, you might be addicted to Facebook (at least according to this study).

    Conclusion: Is Social Media Addictive?

    Whether people are “addicted” or not, social media is becoming a huge part of our society, both in terms of our personal lives and business lives.

    How much time does social media take up of your day?

    Provided by Total DUI.